Posts

Results

About Use-It-Wisely

Results

Below are links to a series of information posters, one for each relevant sector/project cluster, detailing the actions and results from participation in the Use-It-Wisely project.

Cluster 01 – Turbines
Collaborative management of inspection results in power plant turbines
(Tecnatom)

Cluster 02 – Rock Crushers
Upgrading in Mining & Construction Business
(Metso / RDVelho / VTT)

Cluster 03 – Space
Space Cluster: a Solution-Oriented Quicker Collaboration Suite
(Thales Alenia Space / Altec / Vastalla)

Cluster 04 – Vehicles
Virtual Reality Evaluation of Factory Changes
(Volvo / Chalmers University)

Cluster 05 – Shipping
A holistic approach to managing small naval vessels: From business innovation to VR visualisation
(ICCS / INSB / Ocean / Seability)

Cluster 06 – Furniture
Sustainable Product Design and Reuse
(Gispen / TNO)

Latest Updates

Ocean Shipyards

Keeping Tourism Afloat

Ocean Shipyard is a family-run business whose history can be traced back almost a hundred years. The father and grandfather of Vassilis Stratis founded Ocean and started out supplying small wooden fishing boats to fishermen in Northern Greece. Vassilis now works with his father in a state of the art shipyard just outside Athens in Greece, supplying a range of vessels, from passenger boats for the tourism industry, to boats for personal and recreational use, as well as industrial and professional uses. Read more

Media

Media

Video: Use-It-Wisely Final Event – Brussels, October 2016

The following series of videos were recorded at the final Use-It-Wisely event that took place in Brussels, Belgium, on 19th October, 2016. The first video is a longer piece around the event and it is followed by a series of interviews with project partners and other stakeholders.


Erastos Filos


Göran Granholm


Bjorn Johansson


Eric Cauchi


Karin Verplogen


Riika Virkkunen


Stefano Chiado


Tommi Mannerjoki


Video: Project Partners’ Overview

In this video we meet some of the project partners who talk about their role in the project, what excites them about the project and what it is they aim to achieve over its duration.


Video: Project Overview by Göran Granholm

In this, the first video for the Use-it-wisely project, the project’s coordinator Goran Granholm gives an overview of why the project is exciting, how it is structured and what the participants aim to achieve.


Latest Updates

Publications

About Use-It-Wisely

Publications

Project Deliverables

Below are download links to the available Project Deliverables.
More will be added as they become available.


Conference Papers

Langley, A. and McDonnell, P. (2016) The Development of a Cross-Industrial Community of Practice Using Participatory Design presented at euroVR 2016 (Athens, Greece), November 2016.
The Development of a Cross-Industrial Community of Practice Using Participatory Design (PDF 342Kb)

Scientific Journals and Industry Publications

Fox, S. and Richardson, M. (2016) Is Australia ready for moveable factories? Australian Manufacturing Technology Magazine, 16(5) p.28.
http://amtil.com.au/uploads/AMT_OCTNOV2_2016/index.html#28

Fox, S. and Grösser, S. Reframing the relevance of research to practice. European Management Journal, 34(5), 457–465.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0263237316300883

Abstract
We explain that the extant framing of research relevance is skewed because it is centred upon irrelevance of much research knowledge to practitioners, while excluding or under emphasising the irrelevance of much practice knowledge to practitioners. Moreover, the current framing is skewed because the extant literature disregards the very common collaboration between researchers and practitioners. In addition, we explain that the current framing of research relevance is indistinct because theory, practice, and relevance are discussed in vague terms rather than specific terms. Furthermore, the current framing of research relevance is indistinct because there is little reference to theory knowledge. We argue that current skewed and indistinct framing obscures the complexity of relevance. As a result, overly simplistic assertions have been made about how relevance can be increased. We broaden and balance the framing of research relevance. We provide greater specificity in the explanation of factors that contribute to the complexity of relevance. We provide recommendations for addressing the complexity of relevance.

Fox, S. and Grösser, S. (2015) Economical information and communication design for multi-national projects. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 8(3), 574 – 585.
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/IJMPB-02-2015-0014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to inform information and communication design (ICD) for multi-national projects through the presentation of an example that does not rely on expensive expertise in graphic design.
Design/methodology/approach: Action research involving participants from five different sectors.

Findings: Successful ICD is not necessarily dependent upon costly graphic design of elaborate explanatory methods such as storyboards.

Research limitations/implications: The action research involved participants from only five differect sectors.

Practical implications: Economical ICD can facilitate development of understanding among multi-sector multi-national project participants.

Originality/value: The originality of this research note is that it addresses recent developments in ICD. The value of this research note is that an example is provided of application in a multi-sector multi-national project.

Fox, S. (2015) Relevance: a framework to address preconceptions that limit perceptions of what is relevant. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 8(4), 804 – 812.
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/IJMPB-05-2015-0040

Purpose: Erroneous perceptions of relevance contribute to business projects not being successful. Although the importance of relevance is recognized in the project management literature, thus far there has not been a formal framework for addressing erroneous perceptions of relevance. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a framework for identifying and counteracting erroneous perceptions of relevance.

Design/methodology/approach: The research comprised review of the literature relating to factors that contribute to, and methods that counteract, erroneous perceptions of relevance.

Findings: Contributory factors to erroneous perceptions of relevance include cultural cognition, path dependencies, lock-ins, fads, and hype. Mediating factors include priming and questioning, counterfactual reasoning, and optimal stopping.

Research limitations/implications: A classification of erroneous perceptions of relevance is introduced Type III (inept positive) errors, Type II (false negative) errors, and Type I (false positive) errors. This terminology has the advantage of already being known to academics through statistical hypothesis testing, and to practitioners through process capability studies.

Practical implications: The introduction of a framework for identifying and counteracting erroneous perceptions of relevance can better enable practitioners to make the selection of relevant concepts and technologies for projects – a capable process.

Originality/value: The originality of this research note is that it provides a framework that can be applied to increase objectivity in perceptions of relevance. The value of this research note is that it introduces a framework for identifying and counteracting erroneous perceptions of relevance before the application of methods such as cost-benefit analysis.

Fox, S. and Grösser, S. (in press) Reframing the relevance of research to practice. European Management Journal,
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0263237316300883

Abstract
We explain that the extant framing of research relevance is skewed because it is centred upon irrelevance of much research knowledge to practitioners, while excluding or under emphasising the irrelevance of much practice knowledge to practitioners. Moreover, the current framing is skewed because the extant literature disregards the very common collaboration between researchers and practitioners. In addition, we explain that the current framing of research relevance is indistinct because theory, practice, and relevance are discussed in vague terms rather than specific terms. Furthermore, the current framing of research relevance is indistinct because there is little reference to theory knowledge. We argue that current skewed and indistinct framing obscures the complexity of relevance. As a result, overly simplistic assertions have been made about how relevance can be increased. We broaden and balance the framing of research relevance. We provide greater specificity in the explanation of factors that contribute to the complexity of relevance. We provide recommendations for addressing the complexity of relevance.

Aromaa, S. and Väänänen, K. (2016) Suitability of virtual prototypes to support human factors/ergonomics evaluation during the design Applied Ergonomics, 56, 11-18.
researchgate.net/publication/298796892_Suitability_of_virtual_prototypes_to_support_human_factorsergonomics_evaluation_during_the_design

Grösser, S. and Jovy, N. (2016) Business model analysis using computational modelling: a strategy tool for exploration and decision-making Journal of Management Control Journal of Management Control, 27(1), 61-88.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00187-015-0222-1

Lindskog, E., Berglund, J. and Vallhagen, J. (2016) On The Trade-off between Data Density and Data Capture Duration in 3D Laser Scanning for Production System Engineering Procedia CIRP, 41, 697-701.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212827116000366

Lindskog, E., Vallhagen, J., Berglund, J. and Johansson, B. (2016) Improving Lean Design of Production Systems by Visualization Support Procedia CIRP, 41, 602-607.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212827116000159

Lindskog, E., Berglund, J., Vallhagen, J. and Johansson, B. (2014) Lean Based Problem Solving using 3D Laser Scanned Visualizations of Production Systems International Journal of Engineering Science and Innovative Technology (IJESIT), 3(3), 556-563.
http://www.ijesit.com/Volume 3/Issue 3/IJESIT201403_69.pdf

Latest Updates

Project Partners

About Use-It-Wisely

Project Partners

20

Partners

10

Sectors

9

Countries

6

Clusters

1

Vision

All Project Partners

Latest Updates

Ocean

Manufacturing Partner – Ship Building

Greece

Ocean
Anoiksis 8,
Ag. Georgios,
Koropi,
Attica,
P.O. 385,
Greece.

Tel: 0030 210 6021419
Fax: 0030 210 6021556
Email: ocean@ocean.gr
Web: www.ocean.gr

Ocean shipyard (M. Muscat – K. Stratis Co.) was founded in 1982 by Konstantinos B. Stratis and Michael K. Muscat in Peania Attica. The company started out by manufacturing wooden fishing vessels, continuing the Moschatou family tradition of shipbuilding which began with the establishment of a police state. The yard is also directly linked to the famous Kavala shipyard which, for decades previously, built wooden boats of various types and sizes to cater for both local and national freight and fishing needs.

Growing and adapting over time, in line with the industry, the shipyard developed a comprehensive range of commercial boats, of between 7.50m and in size, made entirely from composite materials such as fibreglass-reinforced plastic. This range proved so successful that Ocean had now become a leader in Greek commercial vessel manufacturing, working with coastal fisheries and the largest fish farms in the country.

As demand increased for larger, faster and more reliable vessels, in the late 1990s the shipyard turned to building ‘Deep V’ hull type speedboats ranging in length from 12m to 15.50m. Having developed and established this solid and reliable hull type as its foundation, the yard went on to build tens of passenger vessels for the tourism industry, personnel transport vessels, barges and research vessels as well as offshore fishing boats.

Having gained years of experience from manufacturing these vessels, in 2007 Ocean commenced refreshing and renewing their older models to create new ones starting with the Ocean 33 (995) in two versions – recreational and commercial – and continuing with the Ocean 1400, Ocean 1650 and 850V.

All Project Partners

Latest Updates

About Use-It-Wisely

About Use-It-Wisely

About Use-It-Wisely

Use-it-wisely is a European Union research project, funded under the FP7 framework, which will run from 2013 to 2016. The project draws on the world class knowledge of twenty partners from all over Europe, who are all leaders in their respective fields including: energy, machinery, space, office workspace, vehicles, ship building, furniture, academia, research, dissemination and exploitation.

Read more

Pages

Results

About Use-It-Wisely

Results

Below are links to a series of information posters, one for each relevant sector/project cluster, detailing the actions and results from participation in the Use-It-Wisely project.

Cluster 01 – Turbines
Collaborative management of inspection results in power plant turbines
(Tecnatom)

Cluster 02 – Rock Crushers
Upgrading in Mining & Construction Business
(Metso / RDVelho / VTT)

Cluster 03 – Space
Space Cluster: a Solution-Oriented Quicker Collaboration Suite
(Thales Alenia Space / Altec / Vastalla)

Cluster 04 – Vehicles
Virtual Reality Evaluation of Factory Changes
(Volvo / Chalmers University)

Cluster 05 – Shipping
A holistic approach to managing small naval vessels: From business innovation to VR visualisation
(ICCS / INSB / Ocean / Seability)

Cluster 06 – Furniture
Sustainable Product Design and Reuse
(Gispen / TNO)

Latest Updates

Media

Media

Video: Use-It-Wisely Final Event – Brussels, October 2016

The following series of videos were recorded at the final Use-It-Wisely event that took place in Brussels, Belgium, on 19th October, 2016. The first video is a longer piece around the event and it is followed by a series of interviews with project partners and other stakeholders.


Erastos Filos


Göran Granholm


Bjorn Johansson


Eric Cauchi


Karin Verplogen


Riika Virkkunen


Stefano Chiado


Tommi Mannerjoki


Video: Project Partners’ Overview

In this video we meet some of the project partners who talk about their role in the project, what excites them about the project and what it is they aim to achieve over its duration.


Video: Project Overview by Göran Granholm

In this, the first video for the Use-it-wisely project, the project’s coordinator Goran Granholm gives an overview of why the project is exciting, how it is structured and what the participants aim to achieve.


Latest Updates

Publications

About Use-It-Wisely

Publications

Project Deliverables

Below are download links to the available Project Deliverables.
More will be added as they become available.


Conference Papers

Langley, A. and McDonnell, P. (2016) The Development of a Cross-Industrial Community of Practice Using Participatory Design presented at euroVR 2016 (Athens, Greece), November 2016.
The Development of a Cross-Industrial Community of Practice Using Participatory Design (PDF 342Kb)

Scientific Journals and Industry Publications

Fox, S. and Richardson, M. (2016) Is Australia ready for moveable factories? Australian Manufacturing Technology Magazine, 16(5) p.28.
http://amtil.com.au/uploads/AMT_OCTNOV2_2016/index.html#28

Fox, S. and Grösser, S. Reframing the relevance of research to practice. European Management Journal, 34(5), 457–465.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0263237316300883

Abstract
We explain that the extant framing of research relevance is skewed because it is centred upon irrelevance of much research knowledge to practitioners, while excluding or under emphasising the irrelevance of much practice knowledge to practitioners. Moreover, the current framing is skewed because the extant literature disregards the very common collaboration between researchers and practitioners. In addition, we explain that the current framing of research relevance is indistinct because theory, practice, and relevance are discussed in vague terms rather than specific terms. Furthermore, the current framing of research relevance is indistinct because there is little reference to theory knowledge. We argue that current skewed and indistinct framing obscures the complexity of relevance. As a result, overly simplistic assertions have been made about how relevance can be increased. We broaden and balance the framing of research relevance. We provide greater specificity in the explanation of factors that contribute to the complexity of relevance. We provide recommendations for addressing the complexity of relevance.

Fox, S. and Grösser, S. (2015) Economical information and communication design for multi-national projects. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 8(3), 574 – 585.
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/IJMPB-02-2015-0014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to inform information and communication design (ICD) for multi-national projects through the presentation of an example that does not rely on expensive expertise in graphic design.
Design/methodology/approach: Action research involving participants from five different sectors.

Findings: Successful ICD is not necessarily dependent upon costly graphic design of elaborate explanatory methods such as storyboards.

Research limitations/implications: The action research involved participants from only five differect sectors.

Practical implications: Economical ICD can facilitate development of understanding among multi-sector multi-national project participants.

Originality/value: The originality of this research note is that it addresses recent developments in ICD. The value of this research note is that an example is provided of application in a multi-sector multi-national project.

Fox, S. (2015) Relevance: a framework to address preconceptions that limit perceptions of what is relevant. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 8(4), 804 – 812.
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/IJMPB-05-2015-0040

Purpose: Erroneous perceptions of relevance contribute to business projects not being successful. Although the importance of relevance is recognized in the project management literature, thus far there has not been a formal framework for addressing erroneous perceptions of relevance. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a framework for identifying and counteracting erroneous perceptions of relevance.

Design/methodology/approach: The research comprised review of the literature relating to factors that contribute to, and methods that counteract, erroneous perceptions of relevance.

Findings: Contributory factors to erroneous perceptions of relevance include cultural cognition, path dependencies, lock-ins, fads, and hype. Mediating factors include priming and questioning, counterfactual reasoning, and optimal stopping.

Research limitations/implications: A classification of erroneous perceptions of relevance is introduced Type III (inept positive) errors, Type II (false negative) errors, and Type I (false positive) errors. This terminology has the advantage of already being known to academics through statistical hypothesis testing, and to practitioners through process capability studies.

Practical implications: The introduction of a framework for identifying and counteracting erroneous perceptions of relevance can better enable practitioners to make the selection of relevant concepts and technologies for projects – a capable process.

Originality/value: The originality of this research note is that it provides a framework that can be applied to increase objectivity in perceptions of relevance. The value of this research note is that it introduces a framework for identifying and counteracting erroneous perceptions of relevance before the application of methods such as cost-benefit analysis.

Fox, S. and Grösser, S. (in press) Reframing the relevance of research to practice. European Management Journal,
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0263237316300883

Abstract
We explain that the extant framing of research relevance is skewed because it is centred upon irrelevance of much research knowledge to practitioners, while excluding or under emphasising the irrelevance of much practice knowledge to practitioners. Moreover, the current framing is skewed because the extant literature disregards the very common collaboration between researchers and practitioners. In addition, we explain that the current framing of research relevance is indistinct because theory, practice, and relevance are discussed in vague terms rather than specific terms. Furthermore, the current framing of research relevance is indistinct because there is little reference to theory knowledge. We argue that current skewed and indistinct framing obscures the complexity of relevance. As a result, overly simplistic assertions have been made about how relevance can be increased. We broaden and balance the framing of research relevance. We provide greater specificity in the explanation of factors that contribute to the complexity of relevance. We provide recommendations for addressing the complexity of relevance.

Aromaa, S. and Väänänen, K. (2016) Suitability of virtual prototypes to support human factors/ergonomics evaluation during the design Applied Ergonomics, 56, 11-18.
researchgate.net/publication/298796892_Suitability_of_virtual_prototypes_to_support_human_factorsergonomics_evaluation_during_the_design

Grösser, S. and Jovy, N. (2016) Business model analysis using computational modelling: a strategy tool for exploration and decision-making Journal of Management Control Journal of Management Control, 27(1), 61-88.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00187-015-0222-1

Lindskog, E., Berglund, J. and Vallhagen, J. (2016) On The Trade-off between Data Density and Data Capture Duration in 3D Laser Scanning for Production System Engineering Procedia CIRP, 41, 697-701.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212827116000366

Lindskog, E., Vallhagen, J., Berglund, J. and Johansson, B. (2016) Improving Lean Design of Production Systems by Visualization Support Procedia CIRP, 41, 602-607.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212827116000159

Lindskog, E., Berglund, J., Vallhagen, J. and Johansson, B. (2014) Lean Based Problem Solving using 3D Laser Scanned Visualizations of Production Systems International Journal of Engineering Science and Innovative Technology (IJESIT), 3(3), 556-563.
http://www.ijesit.com/Volume 3/Issue 3/IJESIT201403_69.pdf

Latest Updates

Project Partners

About Use-It-Wisely

Project Partners

20

Partners

10

Sectors

9

Countries

6

Clusters

1

Vision

All Project Partners

Latest Updates

Ocean

Manufacturing Partner – Ship Building

Greece

Ocean
Anoiksis 8,
Ag. Georgios,
Koropi,
Attica,
P.O. 385,
Greece.

Tel: 0030 210 6021419
Fax: 0030 210 6021556
Email: ocean@ocean.gr
Web: www.ocean.gr

Ocean shipyard (M. Muscat – K. Stratis Co.) was founded in 1982 by Konstantinos B. Stratis and Michael K. Muscat in Peania Attica. The company started out by manufacturing wooden fishing vessels, continuing the Moschatou family tradition of shipbuilding which began with the establishment of a police state. The yard is also directly linked to the famous Kavala shipyard which, for decades previously, built wooden boats of various types and sizes to cater for both local and national freight and fishing needs.

Growing and adapting over time, in line with the industry, the shipyard developed a comprehensive range of commercial boats, of between 7.50m and in size, made entirely from composite materials such as fibreglass-reinforced plastic. This range proved so successful that Ocean had now become a leader in Greek commercial vessel manufacturing, working with coastal fisheries and the largest fish farms in the country.

As demand increased for larger, faster and more reliable vessels, in the late 1990s the shipyard turned to building ‘Deep V’ hull type speedboats ranging in length from 12m to 15.50m. Having developed and established this solid and reliable hull type as its foundation, the yard went on to build tens of passenger vessels for the tourism industry, personnel transport vessels, barges and research vessels as well as offshore fishing boats.

Having gained years of experience from manufacturing these vessels, in 2007 Ocean commenced refreshing and renewing their older models to create new ones starting with the Ocean 33 (995) in two versions – recreational and commercial – and continuing with the Ocean 1400, Ocean 1650 and 850V.

All Project Partners

Latest Updates

About Use-It-Wisely

About Use-It-Wisely

About Use-It-Wisely

Use-it-wisely is a European Union research project, funded under the FP7 framework, which will run from 2013 to 2016. The project draws on the world class knowledge of twenty partners from all over Europe, who are all leaders in their respective fields including: energy, machinery, space, office workspace, vehicles, ship building, furniture, academia, research, dissemination and exploitation.

Read more